Private Reserve – Ebony Green Ink Review

  • Where to buy: The Writing Desk [Here]
  • Price: £7.99
  • Bottle size: 66ml
  • Colour: Green-Black
  • Shading: Some
  • Sheening: Some, but minimal
  • Recommend?: A great professional ink but can make writing fun due to the shade

I feel that this colour remains true to its name. When I think of green inks, I think of a lighter green that one would use to annotate an essay or something. but this ink is dark enough for me to be comfortable using as a main body ink.IMG_2577(a little bit of sheen!)

Green is my least favourite colour if I’m honest. That being said, I like this ink. I don’t think it’s a love, but definitely one I will consider buying a full bottle (or at least try another sample). So if I like the green colour then I would only assume that others would feel favourably towards it.

As with the two other Private Reserve inks, the flow is great and the colour is well saturated. I would liken this range of inks to Pilot’s Iroshizuku ink. But with a more appealing price tag (for the same volume of ink), though with less sheen (aside from Ebony Blue, which has a very nice amount of sheening).

I don’t really have anything bad to say about this ink, other than at the end of the day, it’s still green.. But that’s like ordering a cheeseburger and complaining to the manager that your burger has cheese in it…

It gets my approval. IMG_2576The ink looks great and still professional – if you have read my other reviews then you’ll know that I adore inks that can be fun but also professional. Though, sometimes I just can’t fault writing with a bright pink ink.IMG_2579Though, you can easily see that this isn’t a shader. Again, just like the other two inks. Is this a turn off? Ehh. Perhaps in this ink I wouldn’t mind a little bit of shading.IMG_2578Obligatory – this isn’t waterproof.

IMG_2575On cheap paper it actually does quite well. The other inks began to misbehave pretty much from a medium nib grade onwards, but this ink is great even with the broad and italic nibs. Doesn’t fair well with flex writing, but certainly better than the other two. This truly is a professional ink, and useful if you’re in the office and don’t have any choice over paper quality, but still want to use that broad pen you adore.

I RECEIVED THESE INK SAMPLES FROM ‘THE WRITING DESK’ INK EXCHANGE FOR THIS HONEST REVIEW. NOTHING ELSE WAS PROVIDED FOR THESE P.R INK REVIEWS. ALL VIEWS ARE MY OWN. I WOULD LIKE TO THANK ‘THE WRITING DESK’ AND ‘UNITED INKDOM’ FOR THE OPPORTUNITY TO REVIEW THIS.

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Private Reserve – Ebony Blue Ink Review

  • Where to buy: The Writing Desk [Here]
  • Price: £7.99
  • Bottle size: 66ml
  • Colour: Grey-Green
  • Shading: Some
  • Sheening: A bit
  • Recommend?: It’s a good professional ink, but it’s very close to Noodler’s Prime of the Commons and I would far rather use that – especially as it’s bulletproof and £/ml is more economical.

Blue Suede I let off the hook for its name. Unfortunately I cannot do the same for this ink. This colour is not an ebony blue. It’s more of a grey-green. It reminds me of Noodler’s Prime of the Commons, but greener.

By “ebony blue”, I expected a nice saturated blue-black (or… Black-blue, rather). Disappointed? Well, I would be lying if I said I’m not a little disappointed.IMG_2371

HOWEVER! I am not put off of the ink; I think it is a very nice colour with some really nice sheening that you would usually see in Iroshizuku or Diamine Majestic Blue. I just feel a little let down by P.R for the naming.

The ink is, in my eyes, a grey-green, perhaps a grey-teal, but heavily leaning on the green side. It is much more of a vibrant colour compared to Prime of the Commons, but without the fancy “anti-tamper” quality. As I said, this also has more sheen to it.

The flow is very good, and it lubricates the nib very well. I have found that the Private Reserve inks I’ve tried are all well-flowing and wet (of course, the pen does play a part in this). I love wet inks as well, so thumbs up.

In conclusion, I really do like this ink. I would have to edit the label on the bottle, however… Maybe I am just being silly. I feel the ebony is too toned down and the green in the blue too obvious.IMG_2368

So – would I recommend this ink? Yes. For the colour I think that it is great. It is one that you can use professionally but because of the sheen, it is still quite fun.

Like with other Private Reserve inks, the ink isn’t very waterproof. Though, when it is exposed to water, you see something interesting……IMG_2370Its green..

IMG_2376But it’s hard to deny that this ink has a really nice colour to it, regardless of any naming. After all, it’s the ink we’re buying and not the name (though.. Some inks I’ve bought have been partly for the name.. Red Dragon..)

IMG_2405On cheaper paper, the ink performs about the same as other Private Reserve inks. It loses some of its vibrance, but is an otherwise nice ink that would look good in a business setting. With the fine nib it’s pretty much just a plain ink, and only really gets interesting with the broad nib. Feathering is bad with the flex nib, but as I said in the Blue Suede review, that’s to be expected from the flex nib..

Bleed through is quite bad, and this starts with the medium nib. I would recommend using this ink in a fine nib.

Below are pictures of the handwritten review:IMG_2361IMG_2365

I RECEIVED THESE INK SAMPLES FROM ‘THE WRITING DESK’ IN EXCHANGE FOR AN HONEST REVIEW. NOTHING ELSE WAS PROVIDED FOR THESE P.R INK REVIEWS. ALL VIEWS ARE MY OWN.

I WOULD LIKE TO THANK ‘TWD’ AND UNITED INKDOM FOR THE OPPORTUNITY TO REVIEW THIS.

Private Reserve – Blue Suede Ink Review

  • Where to buy: The Writing Desk [Here]
  • Price: £7.99
  • Bottle size: 66ml
  • Colour: Teal
  • Shading: Some, but not a lot
  • Sheening: Very minimal
  • Recommend?: Absolutely! – Great for personal and professional applications

I hate spoilers. You know what I don’t hate? This ink. (sorry- spoiler alert).IMG_2343

I have no experience with Private Reserve inks, well, until now. Blue Suede is an ink I wish I got sooner. No doubt I’ll be picking up a full bottle when I get through this sample (or probably before then! (In the day or so it’s taken me to type this from my handwritten review, I have indeed bought a full bottle of this)).

However, there’s something that irks me about Private Reserve. That is, how they name their inks. Is this the colour of blue suede? No. It’s a teal. Do I have a problem with teal inks? Absolutely not – I have been interested in getting more of this colour since trying Pelikan’s Aquamarine. But to me, this is not what the colour of blue suede should look like. This is only the name of the ink and not a property of; so I shan’t fuss over nomenclature… That’s for another time.IMG_2342

So let’s get back to the positives! All Private Reserve inks are (as far as I am aware) pH neutral. That is, they won’t (or shouldn’t) damage your pens. Does that matter to me? Eh. Not too much. As long as it’s not hydrochloric acid or in a vintage pen. I am fairly game – I use a lot of Diamine inks and they can run pretty low on the pH scale. If you have a vintage pen from someone in your family that means a lot, you should feel safe with using this ink. However, for said property, you do lose the option of a waterproof ink. Again, this isn’t something too terribly important to me. Though, when I go to university, I will likely have a waterproof ink or two… I digress.IMG_2346

I like wet inks. This is a fairly wet ink, but it isn’t nice and wet like Iroshizuku or Alt Goldgrün. I understand that’s also partly to do with the pen you use. One property that I do love in an ink is shading. This exhibits next to none. You know, in a way, it actually works. In this case I am content with not seeing loads of shading.IMG_2345.jpg

Which brings me nicely on to my next point: the application in a professional setting. I would be careful using a teal ink in this case. I would be happy to use it for school notes, but nothing ‘too important’. I would say it’s halfway between ‘fun’ and ‘professional’.

On cheaper paper, the ink fairs well. It becomes much duller, but I think that can be expected. As a result, I think this would be a lovely ink for one to use when the paper choice isn’t that great, as it still offers a pop that you won’t get from other inks. IMG_2348The ink was even able to handle 1.1mm stubs and the italic nibs (something I witnessed with pretty much all three of the Private Reserve inks that I have reviewed thus far). One thing it doesn’t do well with is the flex pen. But.. What ink does do well when it comes to a flex pen and copy paper?IMG_2351.jpgBleedthrough is obvious on the fatter nib widths. Though, surprisingly you only really see bleedthrough on the second pass of the cotton bud swab. The first layer actually did very well. If you’re using this ink on cheaper paper, then I highly recommend a fine nib or a medium nib.

So, to sum up, yes. I adore this ink. Yes, I will buy a full bottle of it and yes. You should too! Below you will see the handwritten review on Rhodia A4 lined paper.IMG_2340IMG_2341

 

I was sent these ink samples from The Writing Desk in exchange for an honest review. All views expressed are my own and I received no other compensation for providing this review.