Super 5 Fountain Pen (Delhi)

Orange is the new black? Ahh, c’mon. You knew it was coming. After my Blue Sea review I feel pressured to keep up the puns.. Anyway, while I’m not a fan of the show, I am definitely a fan of this pen.

Super 5 (which you can find hier (German website, but easy to navigate)) name their inks (all of which I shall review in the future) and their pens after geographical locations:

  • Delhi – Orange
  • Darmstadt – Black
  • Australia – Burgundy
  • Arctic – White (pen only)
  • Atlantic – Blue
  • Dublin – Green
  • Frankfurt – Grey (ink only)

And the pens are identified in rather peculiar ways, if you ask me. The one I was sent is the Super 5 ‘B’. It’s said to be a calligraphic 1.5mm nib. It’s not. It can be found on their website for €24.90 (£21.33 at time of writing (30th Jan 2017)) which I personally find rather steep. Throw in a couple more quid and you can get yourself a TWSBI Eco. I like this pen, but I prefer the Eco.

When I first opened the package containing this pen, which was kindly sent to me by a fellow United Inkdom reviewer, whom received the pen from Super 5 themselves for review purposes, I was a little taken back and my first impression wasn’t entirely positive. But never judge a book by its cover! I promptly inked it up by syringe filling the small standard international cartridge that is supplied with the pen (as the converter you have to pay for separately) with the Super 5 Delhi ink and put the nib to the paper and my first negative impressions had disappeared.

Super 5 fountain pen

The nib is smooth. Really smooth. The sort of smooth that if you were in the bar with your significant other, they would be going home with this nib instead; it’s that smooth. Of course, part of this is attributed to the fact that it’s a broad nib, which are generally smoother than finer nib grades due to the way that they are made in order to be broad. If you wanted a smooth nib but with a little feedback, this is not for you. I am not really sure where the nibs are sourced; whether they are made in house (which personally I doubt but I may be wrong) or if they’re from an outside company. They are certainly not Bock or JoWo nibs.

The nib is nice and wet, though in the writing sample below, it might not seem that way but I’d put it down due to the ink being fairly dry, because the line it lays down initially is very wet indeed.

fullsizeoutput_6d5

Reverse writing gives you a line that’s very similar to the Super 5 rollerball (which I will also review). It’s doable but not very pleasant to write with. It also runs dry very quickly. In terms of line variation, it’s already quite a broad nib and there’s not much give to it; it’s quite stiff. Can squeeze some out, though.

fullsizeoutput_6d6The final point on the nib is that the nib keeps up with the wet flow when fast writing. I cannot work out what I wrote, it was a while ago. I suppose I was practising my doctor’s handwriting.

fullsizeoutput_6d4
“Fast writing the feed keeps up well. A..” I give up.

The section is larger (if you read my handwritten review then I apologise for going in a complete reverse order..) than others and made of plastic, so it isn’t slippy and is also comfortable as you can hold a little higher up the section – if that’s what you usually want to do.

fullsizeoutput_6d8

It is clear to see that the pen is strikingly orange. This is what put me off; it’s a plastic pen and it’s bright orange. I’m no stranger to gaudy and ostentatious pens, but for some reason on first inspection this didn’t do it for me. After pairing it with the Delhi ink, I sort of became to appreciate it and I do like the contrast with the black clip. There are other colours, however, so if orange is a deal breaker then you can always go for white, black, blue, green or red. While it is plastic, I would be careful converting it to an eyedropper.

fullsizeoutput_6d3

Which segues nicely — for some unknown reason to me, the blind cap screws off. I have no clue what purpose this serves. But this means there are additional threads that you will need to be careful with if you do convert it into an eyedropper. As well as the blind cap, the finial also unscrews. Again. Do not know why, because even if you remove the clip which is held in place by the finial, the piece of plastic doesn’t screw on all the way and so leaves a gap in between the finial and the cap body itself. For pedantic people like myself, this is a no go. In addition to this, every single thread is squeaky. Including the one to get to the converter/cartridge.

fullsizeoutput_6d9I really don’t understand why you can do this.

All in all, I’m not disappointed by the pen – quite confused by it, admittedly, and I’d be hesitant to pay the price listed, but it writes and it’s a nice experience. Quality control could be a little better though.

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3 thoughts on “Super 5 Fountain Pen (Delhi)

  1. Thanks for the review!

    The screw-off cap is supposed to indicate the colour of ink, I suppose, as the colours of the pens pretty much go along their inks, as you stated in the beginning of the review.

    Like

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