Kaweco Liliput

Kaweco Liliput fountain pen review ink pearl black fabriano paper

Kaweco is a company from Germany that’s been manufacturing pens since 1833. I was actually aware of Kaweco long before I was in the pen hobby; the Kaweco Sport was a pen I was as familiar with as the Montblanc 149. However, due to aesthetic I was put off. The Liliput, in contrast, did catch my eye. Because of my love for other German pens, such as from Pelikan, I was eager to have a play with a Kaweco. This was my chance.

Kaweco Liliput fountain pen review ink pearl black fabriano paper

I knew that the Liliput was a small pen. However, when I opened the package, I think that I truly did underestimate its size because I thought it would be a bit bigger. There’s probably some Freudian remark to be had there. I wasn’t put off by this – I was nevertheless expecting a less than average pen. Thankfully this is a grower (last one. I promise) as Kaweco thought ahead by putting threads on the end of the barrel so that you can screw the cap on to make it a full size pen; by using threads it means the cap stays on firmly.

Kaweco liliput

Kaweco Liliput pocket pen fountain pen review
dat ass

Ensuring the cap stays on by threads does have its drawbacks as well as advantages – it takes longer to unscrew the cap and then screw it back on the end when you write. As an assumption, you will want to use this on occasion for quick writing, but compare the effort of this with a Pilot Capless which uses a simple click mechanism. You also have to make sure the threads are aligned which surprisingly can be somewhat time consuming, and it also means you can’t post using friction.

Kaweco Liliput size comparison small pocket pen pelican sailor twsbi
(left to right): Pelikan M800, Pelikan M100, Kaweco Liliput, Pilot Custom 823, TWSBI Eco

Kaweco Liliput fountain pen size small comparison pilot pelikan twsbi eco 823 custom m800 souveran

Preventing the pens from rolling became too much, so I decided to stick with just a comparison to the Eco uncapped (of which needs to be cleaned it seems!)

This certainly is a pen that needs to be posted. I can write without the cap posted, but it’s very small and gets uncomfortable during long writing sessions. I’m not someone who enjoys posting pens, but because the cap and body seem to look well integrated (though don’t be fooled, it isn’t as flush as, for example, the Lamy 2000 with its piston knob), it doesn’t look as offending when I post. Which is my issue with the Sport that I mentioned in the introduction. Perhaps this is the result of there being no clip which makes it look as though the cap is part of the barrel (I am aware you can take the clip off the Sport, but the cap bulges out and doesn’t look as well integrated).

IMG_8709
Preventing the pens from rolling became too much, so I decided to stick with just a comparison to the Eco uncapped.

I won’t moan about there not being a clip, just highlight that it’s slightly annoying. Thankfully you can buy a clip separately. I refer to this as the “spaghetti argument”: I once had a customer at a restaurant I worked at who asked me why there was “spaghetti in [their] spaghetti bolognese” (thankfully they realised what they had just said after saying it out loud). Being that this is such a small pen, the lack of a clip is a double edged sword. On the one hand it’s annoying because you can’t clip it to a blazer or shirt or even trouser pocket. At the same time I think it makes the pen more compact and makes it more of a ‘pocket pen’. In addition, I feel it accentuates the aesthetic, which I shall get onto next.

Kaweco Liliput fountain pen review the spaghetti argument
Spooble is a word for whatever reason amuses me. I hope to see this definition on Urban Dictionary or something one day.

The Liliput comes in various colours and finishes – perhaps the most iconic recently is the ‘Fireblue’ which is head treated using a blowtorch to give a blue/brown finish. There is also the brass with its multiple finishes, but I was concerned with the brass making my hand smell of metal, which was also the issue with the copper. I opted for the black because together with the black nib, it makes the pen look so stealthy! In my opinion, that’s what a pocket pen should be – stealthy. Anyone reading the handwritten review or looking at the images, yes – using Kaweco Pearl Black ink is intentional.

Kaweco Liliput fountain pen review

The Kaweco Liliput is a cartridge converter pen. A standard international converter is over half the size of this pen; It can only take short international cartridges. I get nothing for plugging this, but I highly recommend the Kaweco ink cartridges – for two reasons. The first is that you might be able to find a selection that comes in this super awesome dispenser which, if done correctly, becomes a weapon for firing cartridges at potential FP converts. The second, and most important, reason is that the cartridges are resistant little buggers. It took me a good week or so to empty one of them (as a student, a full SI converter will last a day, maybe two at a push). Admittedly, this wasn’t constant use but I probably did use it just about daily. I wrote two English literature essays using this pen amongst other things and it still had ink in it by the time I came to write this review (I did change the ink though. I was using Summer Purple which I just can’t recommend enough – it’s beautiful). You cannot use the Kaweco converter with this pen. After reading numerous reviews of it, I wouldn’t recommend it anyway, but because the pen is so short, when screwing on the barrel you will actually decompress the sac and squirt ink out of the pen.

Kaweco cartridge dispenser
The dispenser operates by twisting the bottom. It can be refilled so don’t worry if you get excited while firing the cartridges. As I did. Many times. It can hold up to 8 small international sized cartridges.

Back on to the nib, it is very pleasant. It’s smooth but with a hint of feedback, which is how I like it. However, it is also rather dry, which is not how I like my nibs. The ink probably plays a part in this as well though, as I remember Summer Purple being far drier than Black Pearl. This may be seen as a positive given that this is a pocket pen and may be used on the fly on cheaper paper and perhaps part of the contributing factor as to why the cartridges last so damn long. I know I can adjust the nib myself to make it write wetter, but doing this will void any warranty on any pen, so beware before you try!  I also didn’t want to adjust the nib for the writing samples so that you can see how the nib writes out of the box (or, rather, tin). Kaweco are notorious for having baby’s bottom on some of their wider nibs, so I’d recommend to go for medium/below or if you’re feeling lucky a broad, but probably best to avoid double broad if you’re apprehensive about working on your own nib.

fullsizeoutput_bab

Reverse writing isn’t too fantastic. It becomes drier and it lasts a word or two. There seems to be a surprisingly decent amount of line variation  for a steel nib, which is nice. If you don’t want a stock steel nib then you can buy a replacement gold nib for £100-120 depending on finishes. If you’re buying from a company you might be able to ask for a little discount if you buy the pen with the gold nib and not be sent the steel, but I’m doubtful they’ll be able to do that for logistic reasons or if it’ll even be worth it. Don’t ask don’t get though, eh? The nib units for many Kaweco pens can be changed between models.

fullsizeoutput_baf

I do enjoy this dainty little pen. Do I think it’s essential? Ehh, no. It’s a nice little thing to have, but you’re not going to live every day regretting not purchasing it. For roughly £40 (for this finish) here in the UK, it falls nicely in the price range between starter pens and more expensive ‘pre-gold nib’ pens. £40 can be seen as a little steep but once owning it, I think it certainly earns its value. Don’t rush out to get this pen, but if you have the means and happen to stumble across it, I certainly wouldn’t say you should pass up the opportunity without a second thought!

Length:

  • Capped: 96.4mm
  • Uncapped: 87.5mm
  • Posted: 125.7mm

Weight:

  • Body: 6g
  • Cap: 4g
  • Total: 10g
Kaweco Liliput fountain pen review pearl black fountain pen blog black metal
lol I finally managed to sort out my printer scanner.. About damn time.

The Liliput fountain pen and ink cartridges/dispenser were supplied by Kaweco in exchange for an honest review. All views expressed are my own.

Pilot Custom 823

This pen was bought by sumgai.

Pilot Custom 823 fountain pen review sumgai
Sumgai: Slang for some guy – a lucky person who goes to auctions/car boot sales and finds pricey pens for cheap prices.

This guy. I found it during one of my eBay pen search marathons. It was found with a few hours left on auction and with no bid activity.

Before getting into the review, I’m going to highlight a few things as they are important to my views on this pen.

I have heard good things about the Pilot 823 and I did my research way before I even found the auction. I discovered that Pilot UK are kind of lacking in terms of availability for products, because this pen is not available for purchase from retailers in the United Kingdom. I always thought this pen was an unnecessary premium.

Let me tell you – this is not unnecessary. It is a fantastic addition to my collection. I bought it a few months ago as of writing and it hasn’t been uninked since I bought it.

Pilot Custom 823 fountain pen review UK England United Kingdom

The Pilot Custom 823 is one of the top of the line pens offered by Pilot. I am not really sure what Pilot’s flagship pen is, but this pen certainly does have a flag at least. The pen has an MRSP of $360 (I think it’s actually retailed at 288), which comes in at about £278 [as of writing, 30/04/2017]. So consider the Pelikan M800 range, in Pound Sterling, anyway. So it is a pricey pen but you certainly get your money’s worth.

The 823 is a vacuum filling pen with a #15 gold nib, which I am told is the same as a #6 size nib that you may be more familiar with. Comparisons to the TWSBI Vac 700 shows that the nibs are the same size.

Pilot Custom 823 fountain pen review UK England United Kingdom Broad Nib

Vacuum fillers are fun little things. Or, rather, big things. They don’t work on the same principle of the vintage Parker Vacumatic fillers, which work on comprising a sac. There are videos and posts out there explaining how to use these filling systems. So I will only gloss over it in this review.

To fill the pen, you unscrew the end cap and pull out the rod. You submerge the nib into the ink (you cannot use cartridges or converters) and push the rod down. This creates a vacuum when the plunger gets to the bottom of the barrel; causing the air to move into the barrel to equalise the pressure. In doing so it draws ink up into the pen. There will be ways to maximise the ink filling capacity, and in that I will recommend watching video demonstrations, as writing out how to do it will be tedious.

Pilot Custom 823 fountain pen review UK England United Kingdom Vacuum fill TWSBI Vac 700

The ink capacity is huge as a result, as you can pretty much use the entire barrel; which you can’t necessarily do with piston pens as the piston mechanism takes up part of the barrel.

One of the things about this filling system that others enjoy is that you can ‘close’ the chamber. This means you don’t have to worry about variations in pressures when, say, flying. You won’t get ink burping if you close the chamber when flying (or, the risk is reduced, so long as you do it correctly).

Pilot Custom 823 fountain pen review UK England United Kingdom piston
Pilot say that you should “unscrew the end cap 2mm to allow for ink flow”. I measured it and it means unscrewing the end cap all the way.

This is a double edged sword, because it means when you are writing in long sessions, you will have to unscrew the end cap so that you can still get ink flow, as you will only be able to use the ink in the chamber. I don’t get annoyed about doing it – it takes 2 seconds and I don’t notice it when writing. If you don’t want to leave it open, you can always unscrew it and refill the chamber if you find it running dry. For example, if you don’t like the aesthetic.

The nib is 14k gold and this thing is smooth. I have a broad nib, so take into consideration that it might be a bit smoother than a fine(r) grade. Being gold, you do get a bit of spring and line variation, but it really isn’t that generous as you do get railroading quite quickly.

Pilot Custom 823 fountain pen review UK England United Kingdom nib

You can reverse write, but it takes the line right down to a fine and it gets quite dry.

Pilot Custom 823 fountain pen review UK England United Kingdom writing sampleAs you can see, the pen is a gusher. The ink that is laid down just looks stunning. The ink of choice is J Herbin Rose Cyclamen and hnnnnng. Fast writing, the feed keeps up impeccably well – take into consideration how wet this nib is; it shows just how well the feed keeps up with writing.

As expected, the writing experience is very nice, which you are almost guaranteed from Pilot.

Something that I didn’t include in the handwritten review is a comparison between the TWSBI Vac 700. Something that made me hesitate buying it (if I could) at retail was that I viewed it just as a TWSBI Vac 700 with a gold nib and a little sleeker (and it is; it’s more business like while I see the Vac as an industrial sort of design – much bulkier and less well integrated between body and section). The 823 is superbly well balanced and well weighted; it isn’t so heavy it’s difficult to write, nor too light that you forget you’re writing. I find that the Vac is a tad more tedious in terms of writing experience. Of course, there’s the gold nib that you have to consider and I find that an unfair comparison. I have never had a problem with a TWSBI nib and I have a fine and 1.1mm stub for my TWSBI Vac and they write perfectly, it’s just that the Pilot is.. Well, a Pilot nib.

The 823 has gold furniture, so that’s another win in my eyes.

Pilot Custom 823 TWSBI Vac 700 comparison review

Both pens measure up near enough the same (the TWSBI is just about longer uncapped) – another similarity is, of course, the vacuum filling mechanism. With the TWSBI you also need to extend the blind cap when writing for long periods. You can, however, disassemble both pens and you can unscrew the piston rod with the TWSBI wrench for the 823.

Pilot Custom 823 TWSBI Vac 700 comparison review

Aesthetically, it’s hard to describe this pen. The design is sort of conservative, but it is ‘turned up a little bit; with the use of transparent/translucent barrels. The 823 looks so much better than a Montblanc 149, which people tend to think of as a ‘business pen’. Both are cigar shaped and have that ‘business’ look to them, but the Montblanc is too boring compared to this.

I bought this pen pen eBay; so I didn’t have a say in the design. But I hope one day to own an amber barrel too. The broad nib is lovely but lately I have been jonesing for finer nibs, but using this nib does make me reconsider that. I also think this is closer to Western broads, if not then it’s only a hairline thinner.

Pilot Custom 823 size comparisons review Pelikan M800 TWSBI Eco Pilot Capless Vanishing PointThe Pilot 823 isn’t a small understated pen. I have large palms but relatively small fingers (to which my girlfriend teases me about..) and I find the pen sits comfortably in my hand, which is great because I hate posting pens.

Pilot Custom 823 size comparisons review Pelikan M800 TWSBI Eco Pilot Capless Vanishing Point

I got the Pilot 823 for a very good price. If you ever have the means to get this, even at full retail, then you will be getting yourself a FANTASTIC pen and I just can’t recommend it enough. If you were to ask me what a ‘next-next level pen’ would be, it’s this.

Weight:

29g overall; 19g body; 10g cap

Length:

149mm capped; 130mm uncapped

Handwritten review with J Herbin Rose Cyclamen.

Pilot Custom 823 fountain pen review handwritten reviewPilot Custom 823 fountain pen review UK England United KingdomPilot Custom 823 fountain pen reviewPilot Custom 823 review fountain pen ink United Kingdom United Inkdom

KWZ – Honey

Before getting into the review of the particular ink, there are a few things I need to iron out. I will first be discussing retailers and then particular pens and how they react with this ink. Rather lengthy, but if this is the first review of the four posts that you’re reading, I recommend reading it. The first part is more ‘for me’, but the second part could save you a pen!

This review is 2(and a half) of 4(and a half) as part of the United Inkdom meta review. Ink samples have been sent to members of the United Inkdom (myself included). These were supplied by Pure Pens. I have, however, bought KWZ inks in the past from Bureau Direct. I want to include this disclaimer because I do not want to continue with a review if I do not highlight where the source of the ink in the review is from for this series. Grapefruit and Cappuccino are full bottles from Bureau that I have bought myself, while Honey and Menthol Green are samples I was sent specifically for review purposes courtesy of Pure Pens.

Finally – KWZ inks have an infamous reputation of reacting with TWSBI pens – specifically the Eco. I have encountered this problem personally, with Grapefruit in my Eco. I know that Honey has been known to stain the pen barrel and Menthol Green apparently stains converters (we shall see in my review if this is the case with me). I am not sure if this is the same case with other TWSBI models (540, 580, Vac 700(R) or (Vac)Mini) – I am not brave enough to try as I do love my TWSBI pens. The barrel gets scratched and it’s very difficult to move the piston – it is thought that the ink reacts with the silicone grease but I am not sure if this is 100% the reason. It is my understanding that KWZ have been working on changing this, but again, I am not brave enough to try and you never know how old the bottle of ink is that you’ve bought (i.e. before or after any reformulation). I have a Pilot 823 that was shipped to me after the original owner used KWZ ink and there’s no damage to the piston arm or any scratching/clouding on the barrel. I haven’t tested it myself though. I have also been told by other users that the Pelikan piston became slightly harder to use (only slightly so) and after reapplying grease it was find again. Use at your own risk.

Jump to another KWZ ink review: (they will be updated with hyperlinks as the reviews are published and all links open in a new window).

  1. Grapefruit
  2. Honey
  3. Menthol Green
  4. Cappuccino

So. Time for the review!

“Oh honey” is what I was saying to myself when I realised what a fool I was for being so late to this party. KWZ Honey was the ink that took KWZ into the mainstream within the pen community (in my observation at least). Why I didn’t get a full bottle of this sooner is beyond me because I rather adore this ink. As with Lamy Dark Lilac, I finally understand the hype.

fullsizeoutput_996

Honey is a thick golden brown substance made by bees and often finds itself mixed into my green tea. This ink only shares one of these characteristics, however.

fullsizeoutput_9a3
If I don’t become a doctor, I know there’s always the chance for me to become an artist. KWZ Honey with honey. And a bee.

KWZ Honey is a saturated golden brown ink that, unlike real honey, is well flowing and will not clog up your pen. I do not own any inks quite like this. I have plenty of browns and the closest in my collection that I could think of was Diamine Autumn Oak, but the comparison was way out as it’s far too orange. Diamine Golden Brown isn’t much of a close match either as it seemed darker and warmer (but I was only going off of comparisons online).

KWZ Ink review wetness
Ink that lubricates the nib and is wet on the page, but has a decent drying time (Clairefontaine Europa paper)
KWZ Honey ink review
Hnnnnnnnnnnnnnnng. The ink looks tasty.

One of the things that attracts people to this ink is how it shades. What I love about the shading is that there’s a lot, but it’s definitely subtle.

KWZ have reformulated Honey (and I am not sure how this affects interaction with TWSBI pens). Konrad, the owner and manufacturer of KWZ ink, says that the colour remains the same, but the scent has gone. I am fortunate to have a very kind friend whom has lent me a sample of the old formulation of Honey. Pure Pens have sent the new formulation to review.

KWZ Honey old formula and new formula comparison

I can certainly tell that the new formulation doesn’t have the KWZ smell. Which is disappointing in my opinion because I really do enjoy the smell

However, while some people have said that they notice differences between the two formulations, I can’t notice any differences.

KWZ Honey old and new ink formulation comparison
Perhaps best represented in this picture – I don’t notice any differences. Old on the left and new on the right.

In my writing sample I did say that the new formula seems lighter, but while reading over it a second time, I can’t even remember where I changed from the pen with the old formula to the pen with the new formula. If you ask me, you won’t lose out on the amazing colour you see online for this ink.

However. I might have to eat my own words when you consider cheaper paper. I do want to point out my hypocrisy – the new formulation does seem to be a little browner/darker when you use it on cheaper paper.

KWZ Honey ink reviewAnd once again, it seems more evident here. The top is the old formula and the bottom is the new formula. Perhaps more red/orange? But rest assured that if you are using the paper that otherwise handles fountain pen ink well, then you’ll see no differences. That’s what I experienced when testing with things such as Rhodia, Clairefontaine and Tomoe River.

I think that KWZ Honey is a truly unique colour and it should feature in everyone’s collection. It isn’t a straight up brown and it isn’t sepia. It is an ink that is easy on the eyes and strays away from characteristics of brown inks which I think is the closest colour family.

The sample for the new formulation of this ink was supplied by Pure Pens, an online retailer based in Wales, UK. Hop on over to their website and snag yourself a bottle for £11.95.

All views expressed are my own. Pure Pens supplied the sample and I received no other compensation for doing this review.

Handwritten review:

fullsizeoutput_994fullsizeoutput_997

KWZ – Grapefruit

KWZ Grapefruit ink review

Before getting into the review of the particular ink, there are a few things I need to iron out. I will first be discussing retailers and then particular pens and how they react with this ink. Rather lengthy, but if this is the first review of the four posts that you’re reading, I recommend reading it. The first part is more ‘for me’, but the second part could save you a pen!

This review is 1 of 4(and a half) as part of the United Inkdom meta review. Ink samples have been sent to members of the United Inkdom (myself included). These were supplied by Pure Pens. I have, however, bought KWZ inks in the past from Bureau Direct. I want to include this disclaimer because I do not want to continue with a review if I do not highlight where the source of the ink in the review is from for this series. Grapefruit and Cappuccino are full bottles from Bureau that I have bought myself, while Honey and Menthol Green are samples I was sent specifically for review purposes courtesy of Pure Pens.

Finally – KWZ inks have an infamous reputation of reacting with TWSBI pens – specifically the Eco. I have encountered this problem personally, oddly enough with this exact ink, Grapefruit. I know that Honey has been known to stain the pen barrel and Menthol Green apparently stains converters (we shall see in my review if this is the case with me). I am not sure if this is the same case with other TWSBI models (540, 580, Vac 700(R) or (Vac)Mini) – I am not brave enough to try as I do love my TWSBI pens. The barrel gets scratched and it’s very difficult to move the piston – it is thought that the ink reacts with the silicone grease but I am not sure if this is 100% the reason. It is my understanding that KWZ have been working on changing this, but again, I am not brave enough to try and you never know how old the bottle of ink is that you’ve bought (i.e. before or after any reformulation). I have a Pilot 823 that was shipped to me after the original owner used KWZ ink and there’s no damage to the piston arm or any scratching/clouding on the barrel. I haven’t tested it myself though.

Jump to another KWZ ink review: (they will be updated with hyperlinks as the reviews are published)

  1. Grapefruit
  2. Honey
  3. Menthol Green
  4. Cappuccino

So. Time for the review!

KWZ is an ink manufacturer that hit the mainstream within our community around mid-2016. The ink that everyone was talking about? Honey. However, when KWZ finally came to the UK in the autumnal months of 2016, I dipped my toes into the KWZ ink pool with Grapefruit. Mainly because at the London Pen Show, where I bought the ink, Honey was already gone.

KWZ Grapefruit ink review

So what made me go for Grapefruit? Looking at the ink sheet showing all the various inks at the pen show, one colour bounced off the page. In that moment I realised that I didn’t have an orange ink in my collection.

I also like grapefruit.

KWZ Grapefruit fountain pen ink review honey dragon's napalm
Ink on Clairefontaine Europa paper. The ink is very very wet and saturated, but it does dry in a reasonable time frame.

When I got home I was quick to ink a pen up with it. However, when I opened the bottle, there was a distinct smell of thyme. I messaged the London pen club group chat and others had the same smell. A quick Internet search told us that this smell, for KWZ, is normal. This isn’t an issue for me as I’m rather fond of the smell. I like it even more when the ink has been in the pen for a few days as it then smells of vanilla. You can even smell it on the page. One issue people may have is that the smell does linger on the nib for a little while. It’s no different to the scented J Herbin inks, if you are familiar with those. Though, I have noticed that the smell remains on the page for longer.

On copy paper, the ink performs well. There’s show through, but the bleed through is minimal and only really seen on the second swab. The drying time is reduced considerably (as you’ve seen in the images above, the ink is super wet) and it becomes very dry on this paper.

KWZ Grapefruit copy paper ink review

fullsizeoutput_98c
Ink Swab
IMG_7232
Some bleed through on copy paper, but only on a second pass.

KWZ Grapefruit is a bold and vibrant orange. I would say that ‘grapefruit’ is a very appropriate name. The colour jumps off the page but is not hard on the eyes. It is darker and more striking than Noodler’s Dragon’s Napalm. It’s also more saturated than Diamine Autumn Oak and Noodler’s Apache Sunset. It doesn’t, however, shade as much (then again, what does?!)

KWZ Grapefruit Noodler's Dragon's Napalm ink review comparison

Orange inks may not always have practical applications and they are more ‘fun’ inks than business inks. Perhaps a nice alternative to a red for annotations and such? But if you are looking for an orange ink then I would highly recommend KWZ Grapefruit.

This particular bottle was purchased with my own funds at the London Pen Show, 2016, from Bureau Direct at a price of £12.95. KWZ’s Iron Gall inks can be purchased for £16.95

Handwritten review:

fullsizeoutput_986fullsizeoutput_98f

Wing Sung 235 Fountain Pen Review

Wing Sung fountain pen nib

Sometimes when I am bored and should be doing something useful with my time, I will end up on eBay searching to find a new addition to my collection. This was one of those purchases.

I don’t know a whole lot about the brand Wing Sung. I do know a bit in the sense that they are from China and sell relatively cheap pens. In my opinion, they are a more up-market Jinhao.

The pen writes very well. Initially I did have to flush the pen out because I was getting arg starts if I didn’t write with it for about 30 minutes. I didn’t spend £100+ or anything excessive so I’m not really too annoyed about having to do that. After doing it, the pen wrote very well. It’s nice and wet, has no flow issues and it keeps up with quick writing very well. The nib does make quote a bit of noise, but I wouldn’t say that it’s scratchy. I also like the feedback that it provides, but it still has nothing on what I get from my Pelikan M620.

The nib is, however, quite firm – even when taking into account that it’s a steel nib. When trying to squeeze out any line variation, it’s difficult for the feed to keep up.

The nib has an interesting design – it is very Sheaffer-esque. I think it is beautiful, though, I do not appreciate the huge ‘MADE IN CHINA’ stamp I think that could have been left out, or placed on the cap band.

Wing Sung fountain pen nib
I’m sure Wing Sung were going for a heart shape at the top of the nib, but it looks more like a butt..

fullsizeoutput_82c

fullsizeoutput_82b
I do enjoy how the nib wraps around

The pen is incredibly light. I’ve no idea what this material is, but it reminds me of something like carbon fibre. If this pen cost more and was marketed in such a way then I would be fooled.But it is very sturdy; I have a weird tendency to hold the cap in my right hand while I write and dig my thumb into the ring opening. I haven’t noticed any disfiguration.

The converter is an aerometric type converter and I have discovered with all Wing Sung pens (a grand total of 3) I have used that they are all equipped with this style converter and are impossible to remove. This is no exception. On the plus side, you don’t have to worry about losing a converter, but on the other hand, if you need a spare converter to hand and this is your only pen un-inked then you’re out of luck it seems.

As far as I am aware, the 235 only comes in the rose gold finish. In the handwritten review (which you can always find at the bottom of the typed review) I say that it looks more like a typical gold colour. I compared it to another gold pen and I did indeed see a pinky colour to it. The 233 model appears to be a somewhat similar design but in black. These seem to be your only two options.

Of course – I am no stranger to gaudy pens.

Wing Sung 235 Jinhao 1200 fountain pen review

However, unlike the Jinhao 1200, you can actually feel the ridges, while on the 1200 there seems to be some overlay that means you can’t feel them.

All in all, I don’t think that it’s a bad investment for a nib that writes well and looks nice, a pen that is nicely sized and can be something to mess around with because it’s cheap. Certainly, this pen will not be like the others that you have in your collection.

And if it is – we need to get talking!

Diamine Hope Pink on Clairefontaine Europa paper

fullsizeoutput_822fullsizeoutput_823

Pelikan M620 – Piccadilly Circus Special Edition

Pelikan_Piccadilly_Circus_M620_Review

If you want a TL;DR of this pen, I adore it. I will also tell you that I have put another review on hold just so that I have another excuse to write with this pen tonight. Oh. Also, London.

I have lived in London my whole life, and I am so happy that I do. Of the 5 universities I applied to, 4 were in London (I let Mother think this is because I want to stay close to home, but really I just love the city). I really cannot put my love for this city into words. Ykno another thing I really love? Pelikans. Pelicans are pretty cool, also.

Pelikan_Fountain_Pen_Review_Piccadilly_Circus_Special_Edition

So when I discovered that Pelikan did a City Series Edition of London, I NEEDED it. I go to a pen met up every month in London. This is where I met my Chief Enabler (you can read his review here (opens in a new tab)), and you will discover why he has this name. Because not only did he just prompt me to buy a Pilot Custom 823 and not only his Pelikan M100 ‘Stormtrooper’ (I am sure to do a review of these two pens) but also sold me this pen. And I am so thankful because, while I don’t have a grail list, this pen would certainly feature on said list.

Pelikan_London_Fountain_Pen_M620_Special_Edition
I received a few very weird looks when getting these pictures.. More can be found on my Instagram, 7heDaniel

So what makes this a London themed pen, other than by nomenclature? Well, the answer for that lies in the body design, which is difficult to ignore. Pelikan didn’t use this design just because it looks nice (and it does. It so does) but because it mimics the vibrant, neon aesthetic and embodies the out-going nature that Piccadilly represents. This is not a pen that is just sold with a special edition tag with new fancy design and swirls, it means something. To me, that is very important in the pen because if it didn’t have meaning, I think it would completely turn me off.

There is one issue I have with the pen: the furnishings are silver, and I am a gold guy. If I had the choice, then I would have gold furniture on this pen. However, it does not come with that option. But it isn’t something that annoys me as much as I love this pen (I’d say it’s a 3/10 annoyance but I have a 923728463763287/10 love for the pen). That being said, the pen has the Mxx0 nib which is the two-tone gold nib. This might irk some people. It makes it more personal to me so I’m not bothered by it all.

fullsizeoutput_7f5fullsizeoutput_7fa

But talking about the nib, it’s fantastic. It’s a fine, and compared to my M800 fine I think this is a ‘true fine’ while the M800 is a Pelikan fine (for those of you who don’t know, Pelikan nib grades tend to run a tad broader than other Western nibs). It isn’t as smooth, but gosh the feedback is beautiful and it sings! It is also very wet for a fine nib. Reverse writing and line variation can also be had.

The M620 is part of the same size class as the other M6xx pens. I regard 600 as a ‘normal’ size. M8xx as ‘large’ and M1xxx as ‘oversize’. I can still write with this pen without the cap posted — and that is super important as someone whom detests writing with the cap posted. I’ve tested the pens in my hand across the entire range of Pelikans before, so I knew that this size was okay for me. The pen also has the famous Pelikan pelican (ehh) clip which I adore as well as the mama and babba pelicans on the finial.

The pen is also lighter than the M8xx and M1xxx sizes. Not just because it is thinner and smaller, but this pen (along with the 400 & 200 series) doesn’t use a brass piston. So that mitigates a lot of the weight, which is great if you prefer lighter pens. Thankfully I have no preference for every single pen I buy.

fullsizeoutput_7fe
A few more size comparisons. From left to right: TWSBI Eco, TWSBI Vac 700, Pelikan Piccadilly, Sheaffer Legacy Heritage, Montegrappa NeroUno Linea
fullsizeoutput_7ff
A few more size comparisons. From left to right: TWSBI Eco, TWSBI Vac 700, Pelikan Piccadilly, Sheaffer Legacy Heritage & Montegrappa NeroUno Linea

You can buy an M600 for a cheaper price than what I got this for (and if not, you’re looking in the wrong place..!) and it will write exactly the same and feel exactly the same. But the original M60x design will not embody my favourite city in the world and something that has been a big part in my life recently (due to frequent trips into London, particularly with my girlfriend over the past two years). It’s personal to me and I love it. That’s what this hobby is about.

img_6254
I also love tea. Funnily enough, I bought this in a tea shop in Piccadilly long before I got this pen..

Only spend what you think a pen is worth; and to me, this pen is priceless.

fullsizeoutput_800Pelikan_Fountain_Pen_M620_Special_Edition_ReviewPelikan_M620_Special_Edition_Review

Namisu Studio Ebonite – Bock Nibs

As I said in the main review of the pen (which you can find here), I was going to make a separate review looking at the nibs on offer for this pen (excluding the steel medium and the titanium broad nibs). I will look at the extra fine and broad steel nibs and then the medium titanium. Best ’til last? Let’s see.

Bock steel fine nib review

I’m a broad guy but writing with this nib was just pure joy. I mention this in the broad review, but Bock really do nail the grades in my opinion. This is what I would expect from a Western extra fine. However, reverse writing makes it even finer. It’s actually rather impressive handling reverse writing.

Even though it’s an extra fine nib, there’s no scratch but a nice feedback that reminds you that you’re writing. I don’t like glassy smooth nibs. But in comparison to the other two nibs, this one is the hardest and has the least amount of bounce.

 fullsizeoutput_797But that doesn’t mean it doesn’t have any give to it. You press hard enough and you can get some utterly ridiculous line variation with it. As you can see with the smudge, the nib gives quite a wet line, and I found it did so even without much pressure either.

fullsizeoutput_791.jpegThe broad nib is smoother than the extra fine, which is a sort of given, it’s also a little springier. Again, with the broad nib you can get some really amazing line variation out of it. However, it fails when it comes to reverse writing as it gets very dry and it’s incredibly scratchy. fullsizeoutput_792The broad nib has a really generous ink flow. Using Lamy Dark Lilac and I think it really shows the ink off nicely. However, it isn’t so wet that I can’t use it as a lefty overwriter.

And the one you’ve all (I think?) been waiting for..

fullsizeoutput_793I’ve never used a titanium nib before – it was the first nib I went to when testing this pen out. I learnt three things:

  1. These nibs are SO FUN
  2. They’re not really practical
  3. Reverse writing with a titanium nib is awful

I’m fortunate enough to have control over the paper that I use in my day to day life so I was able to use the nib pretty freely. However, when I had to write on poorer paper.. It wasn’t so friendly and didn’t really play nice because it’s incredibly wet, and you can see how that by how much darker the ink is. This also means that your converter drains quicker than with a steel nib of the same grade.

And to drain the converter even quicker, the nib is very bouncy. As I said in the sample, I gave the pen to my mother and she didn’t enjoy it at all because it was “too bouncy”. I’d go as far as saying semi-flex. This actually backs up both posts – the nib is fun but not really practical in every circumstance. Especially with the reverse writing. Whenever I’m writing out formulas, equations or annotations I sometimes like to use the reverse for a little bit because it gives me more space to write as I can write smaller. Not with this nib. Sends a shiver down my spine just thinking about it.

fullsizeoutput_794But damn. Look at how that ink is laid down..!

img_6071But it can lead to smudging from my hooked handwriting. I did notice that sometimes. Usually when I go down line by line prematurely, which I sometimes experience anyway but not as often as I did with this. Again, an absolute gusher. I have no idea what a broad will be like.

So in conclusion, if I had to get one of the nibs, I think I would go for either the titanium and learn to master it or the extra fine because that really stuck with me. Maybe it’s because I usually go for broads and it’s just something new. If practicality is what you’re after, then go for the extra fine. If you want a bit of fun, go for the titanium.

Or.. You could get the titanium for a reduced price and then order your own Bock nib and have both. Consider yourself enabled. *drops mic*